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Featuring Neil Sloane from the OEIS. Full “Amazing Graphs Trilogy” and extras at:

More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓

Neil Sloane is founder of the OEIS:

More videos with Neil:

Amazing Graphs
Part 1:
Part 2:
Part 3:
Extra Bit:

Sequences featured in this video include…
Stern’s:
Hofstadter’s:
And Remy’s:

Thanks Patrons: Arjun Chakroborty, Ben Delo, Jeff Straathof, Jeremy Buchanan, Andy, Yana Chernobilsky, Christian Cooper, Ken Baron, Bill Shillito, Nat Tyce, Ben, Bernd Sing, Dr Jubal John, Tom Buckingham, Giuseppe Bonaccorso, Adam Gold, Andrei M Burke, Adam Savage, Matthew Schuster, Matheson Bayley, James Bissonette, Robert Donato, john buchan, Steve Crutchfield, Jon Padden, Valentin-Eugen Dobrota, Eric Mumford, Charles Southerland, Arnas, Ian George Walker, Jerome Froelich, Tracy Parry, George Greene, Igor Sokolov, Alfred Wallace, Jussi Suontausta, Bodhisattva Debnath.

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Editing and animation by Pete McPartlan

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47 COMMENTS

  1. Numberphile Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Watch the full Amazing Graphs Trilogy (plus an extra bit): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLt5AfwLFPxWLkoPqhxvuA8183hh1rBnG

    Reply
  2. Endo Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    what are the odds that a given sequence will be satisfying?

    Reply
  3. SADCOCK1970 Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    That last sequence graph looks a bit like the first ionisation energy for the elements in sequence. They increase exponentially from Hydrogen, helium, lithium gets a slight drop as you have gone from 1s to 2s. Beryllium, boron gets a drop as you go to 2p, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen gets a drop as 2px now has 2 electrons, fluorine, neon, sodium gets a slight drop as you move to 3s, calcium and on it goes. The slight drops get longer in interval.

    Reply
  4. XAB BAGE Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    What creates the repeating structure of the Q-sequence?

    Reply
  5. Hugo Bouma Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    1:47 Sagrada Familia, anyone?

    Reply
  6. vigorous era Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    8:15 It's probably not the same one, but I wouldn't be entirely surprised if that was "the" Adam Savage, of Mythbusters, as a Patreon supporter.

    Reply
  7. Bevan Ward Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Such magic – thank you for a great introduction. Off to play with overlapping binary place holders 🙂 brilliant stuff

    Reply
  8. Andrew Ince Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Please tell me Neil did the artwork for this series. Those stylised portraits constitute some amazing graph-ics.

    Reply
  9. Vy canon Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    "ill put down a 0, no-ones is going to object to that"
    The subtle sarcasm is strong with this one.

    Reply
  10. David Thacker Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Love this little series

    Reply
  11. Gabriel Ximenes Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    That laptop balanced on top of a pile of books is so upsetting.

    Reply
  12. Gabriel Ximenes Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    This man is now 80 years old. Incredible.

    Reply
  13. Usman Ghani Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    MORE AMAZING GRAPHS PLEASE

    Reply
  14. crystalpie Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    "You could die at any moment."
    Momento Mori

    Reply
  15. Cosmic Nitra Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    7:45 this one has like a shadow offset of the Sierpinski triangle but infinitely repeated…

    Reply
  16. Per Appelgren Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    More Neil, please. He’s always interesting and he’s a very nice person!

    Reply
  17. Francesc Flores Gámez Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    adam savage is one of your patreon what the heck

    Reply
  18. fersarrvaje Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    At 1:52 looks exactly like Sagrada Familia, take a look!

    Reply
  19. Cannon Savage Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    What program do they use to make these graphs?

    Reply
  20. 7177 Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    brilliant, thank you!

    Reply
  21. Zach Durocher Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    This might be my favorite playlist on YouTube

    Reply
  22. Plads Elsker Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    4:50 fibonachi exists in negative values, and so we wouldn't have any problems if we needed the -3rd number of the fibonnachi sequence, for example

    Reply
  23. Lucía Rossi Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    "it could die at any moment… beautiful"
    haha
    Who else is watching at 3 am?

    Reply
  24. Monstache Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Neil sloane is my new favourite numberphile appearance 🙂 I can listen to him for hours! Not that I understand 90% of what he says, but I still like to listen 🙂

    Reply
  25. Midston Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    The graph for the Rémy Sigrist function appears to have curvy Sierpenski-looking objects…

    Reply
  26. Black Screen Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Wow it sounds very ASMR

    Reply
  27. Charles Johnson Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    He should do a math ASMR channel

    Reply
  28. qchen1337 Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    it s like pascals triangle… no no it s actually like fareys series 😀

    Reply
  29. JMEssex Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    But have you checked past 10^(10^40) where the Mertens Conjecture breaks down?

    Reply
  30. ludolfceulen Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    *****
    as it can be seen, basically all the graphs have fractal character – did someone try to calculate the ratio between the size (or beginning of the location) of the repeated parts of the graphs? is it something like feigenbaum constant ??? does the ratio converges in a such graph? this wants the sequences to be calculated very far away (some to milions, some to bilions terms), but the ratio in the fractal graphs could be interesting, is it universal? is it special for every sequence with this kind of graph with fractal character?
    *****

    Reply
  31. N. L. Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    You can see versions of Pascal’s Triangle in the Alps graph.

    Reply
  32. John Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Did I see a serpinski triangle in the 'snow' of the remi segrist graph?

    Reply
  33. Lorcan Owen-Gibbons Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Damn. that last one be looking like a Bob Ross painting

    Reply
  34. Hareecio Nelson Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    The alps are my favourite graph of all the videos, very cool (no pun intended)

    Reply
  35. Snakeyes244 Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    @ 8:36 “plots…in yo asszzzz”

    Reply
  36. Piper Shields Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    this is my favourite channel to watch at 3am

    Reply
  37. Thebenmix 11 Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    0:12 No U

    Reply
  38. Timothy White Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    My life is complete 7:40

    Reply
  39. duffy666 Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Neil Sloane is such an inspiration.

    Reply
  40. shmajent Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Hofstadter's Q Sequence bothers me. I've programmed and found that when it "rescatters" on the graph, there is a high point and a low point, before the graph comes back together again along a slope of approximately y=2x. That is, for every n'th time the graphical represenation of the data rescatters, the highest point of that scatter will predictably be at (2^n + 2^(n-1), 2^n). The lowest point of the n'th scatter will also be found at (2^n + 2^(n-1) + 1, f(n) < 2^n)… However I can't find that function for that low point.

    Reply
  41. Jacob Drum Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    7:54

    That's in my nightmares now.

    Reply
  42. Christian Rodgers Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    His wallpaper reminds me of whataburger…

    Reply
  43. D'ascola Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Its 3 am and I have surgery lecture at 7 am BUT I CAN'T STOP WATCHING I DON'T EVEN TAKE MATHS

    Reply
  44. M.A.X. Meeuwis Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Wouldn't it be a nice empirical thing to plot sequences by a computer (in more dimensions) until we find the Riemann Zeta function?

    Reply
  45. Wospy Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    Next 4th of July I'm coming here instead of watching fireworks.

    Reply
  46. Kasper Joonatan Posted on July 10, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    WHY DON'T THEY SHOW THE RELEASE DATE OF THE VIDEOS?

    Reply
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